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Download Proximity Levinas, Blanchot, Bataille and Communication (Phaenomenologica) epub

by Joseph Libertson




The problematic reality of an alterity implicit in the concept of communication has been a consistent attestation in formal discourse. The rapport of thought to this alterity has been consistently described as a radical inadequation. By virtue of the communicational economy which produces discontinuity and relation, illumination and the possibility of consciousness, an opacity haunts the famili­ arity of comprehension. Consciousness' spontaneity is limited by the difference or discontinuity of the exterior thing, of the exterior subject or intersubjective other, and of the generality of existence in its excess over comprehension's closure. An element implicit in difference or discontinuity escapes the power of comprehension, and even the possibility of manifestation. Within the system of tendencies and predications which characterizes formal discourse, however, this escape of alterity is most often understood as an escape which proceeds from its own substantiality: the unknowable in-itself of things, of subjects, and of generality. Alterity escapes the power of comprehension, on the basis of its power to escape this power. That which escapes the effectivity of consciousness, escapes on the basis of its own effectivity. For this reason, the rapport of inadequation described by the escape may function in formal discourse as a correlation. The inadequation of comprehension and exteriority may function as the vicissitude of a larger adequation. The latent principles of this adequation are power and totalization.
Download Proximity Levinas, Blanchot, Bataille and Communication (Phaenomenologica) epub
ISBN: 9024725062
ISBN13: 978-9024725069
Category: Politics
Subcategory: Philosophy
Author: Joseph Libertson
Language: English
Publisher: Springer; 1982 edition (June 30, 1982)
Pages: 356 pages
ePUB size: 1610 kb
FB2 size: 1855 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 198
Other Formats: docx lrf mobi rtf

Cheber
Brilliant, eccentric, flying recklessly in the face of the critical and philosophical trends of its time, PROXIMITY is an analysis of individuation and difference that has no equal in the history of philosophy. Libertson, never heard of before or since, saw In Levinas, Blanchot and Bataille a nocturnal “involvement” which led him to his own bold conclusions about alterity as a condition of possibility of all separation or individuation. But he did not put this in terms of space, of form or structure like the thinkers of his time. Rather, he put it in the terms of force, of violence. The Other weighs on the Same from within the Same, crushing, suffocating, sucking the breath out of the separate being and at the same time giving it breath, giving it life. Libertson managed to derive this bizarre thematics from the writings of the three thinkers, quoting them copiously to support his arguments. Contradiction after contradiction, paradox after paradox, are compressed as though by a vice as Libertson endlessly repeats that the separate being can have no identity, but has an intense unicity. And the Other, imponderable, unseizable, approaches from within the Self itself. “I cannot approach it. I approaches me, and as it approaches, it creates me.”

He praises Gilles Deleuze, and pauses for a withering footnote about Jacques Derrida’s reading of Levinas. He characterizes Derrida as a Heidegerrian intellectualist unequipped for the challenges of Levinas. Few writers of the time would have dared such a broadside.

Apparently Levinas and Blanchot were in close touch with Libertson during the writing of the book, and both were presented with copies of the Phaenomenologica hardcover. According to one account, Blanchot wrote to Libertson, “ce que vous dites répond si merveilleusement à ce qu’il faut penser qu’il faut encore douter que vous soyez compris.” Libertson is a footnote in one of Levinas’s articles. Beyond this he remains completely unknown, if he is still alive.

Two years ago this writer was in the house where Blanchot lived for many years in Le Mesnil St. Denis, sixty miles from Paris. In the living room where Blanchot used to work is a bookshelf with a small shrine to Blanchot, lovingly kept by his adopted daughter. On the shelf is a cheap snapshot of Blanchot as an old man, a compendium of essays called LIRE BLANCHOT and -- a copy of PROXIMITY.
INvait
Brilliant, eccentric, flying recklessly in the face of the critical and philosophical trends of its time, PROXIMITY is an analysis of individuation and difference that has no equal in the history of philosophy. Libertson, never heard of before or since, saw In Levinas, Blanchot and Bataille a nocturnal "involvement" which led him to his own bold conclusions about alterity as a condition of possibility of all separation or individuation. But he did not put this in terms of space, of form or structure like the thinkers of his time. Rather, he put it in the terms of force, of violence. The Other weighs on the Same from within the Same, crushing, suffocating, sucking the breath out of the separate being and at the same time giving it breath, giving it life. Libertson managed to derive this bizarre thematics from the writings of the three thinkers, quoting them copiously to support his arguments. Contradiction after contradiction, paradox after paradox, are compressed as though by a vise as Libertson endlessly repeats that the separate being can have no identity, but has an intense unicity. And the Other, imponderable, unseizable, approaches from within the Self itself. "I cannot approach it. It approaches me, and as it approaches, it creates me."

He praises Gilles Deleuze, and pauses for a withering footnote about Jacques Derrida's reading of Levinas. He characterizes Derrida as a Heidegerrian intellectualist unequipped for the challenges of Levinas. Few writers of the time would have dared such a broadside.

Apparently Levinas and Blanchot were in close touch with Libertson during the writing of the book, and both were presented with copies of the Phaenomenologica hardcover. According to a brief note in Critique May 1985, Blanchot wrote to Libertson, "ce que vous dites répond si merveilleusement à ce qu'il faut penser qu'il faut encore douter que vous soyez compris." Libertson is a footnote in one of Levinas's articles. Beyond this he remains completely unknown, if he is still alive.

Two years ago this writer was in the house where Blanchot lived for many years in Le Mesnil St. Denis, sixty miles from Paris. In the living room where Blanchot used to work is a bookshelf with a small shrine to Blanchot, lovingly kept by his adopted daughter. On the shelf is a cheap snapshot of Blanchot as an old man, a compendium of essays called LIRE BLANCHOT and -- a copy of PROXIMITY.