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Download Fundamentals of Russian: First Russian Course epub

by Horace G. Lunt




Book by Horace G. Lunt
Download Fundamentals of Russian: First Russian Course epub
ISBN: 0893570974
ISBN13: 978-0893570972
Category: Other
Author: Horace G. Lunt
Language: English
Publisher: Slavica Pub; Revised edition (June 1, 1982)
Pages: 402 pages
ePUB size: 1290 kb
FB2 size: 1602 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 138
Other Formats: docx lrf azw lit

Mr_NiCkNaMe
I had this book for First Year Russian back about 10 years ago. It's probably not the best book for beginning Russian. It's somewhat old with no pictures, games, cultural information, or the other types of things you might find in a modern textbook. However, it did the trick and helped to propel me into what would eventually become my major in college.
Dalarin
With the many phrases related to collective farms, you can tell this book came from the Cold War era. Despite its rather drab appearance, the book is useful in giving the student a solid foundation for the language. There isn't alot of focus on vocabulary, but by the time you finish the book, you will feel comfortable with the difficult aspects of Russian grammar.
Onoxyleili
Despite its age, this is probably the best intro to Russian for beginners. The section on pronunciation is excellent, and so are the sections on case usage and verbs. Everything is presented very clearly, and the examples are easy to follow. Another reviewer seemed to imply that the word for collective farm (kolkhoz) is no longer very important now that the Soviet Union no longer exists. However, according to Nicholas Brown's recent frequency dictionary of Russian, it is still the 487th most frequent word in the language, while vodka is only the 1488th ;-). Russian Learners' Dictionary: 10,000 Russian Words in Frequency Order
Clever
This book is absolutely phenomenal. I used it in a Russian Linguistics course at my undergraduate institution. So what it's an older book, and so what it doesn't have the glossy pictures that more modern books have? If you are looking for cutesy pictures and exercises, this book is not for you, and you probably wouldn't appreciate how helpful this book is, anyway. This book is hands-down the best tool for introductory Russian studies.

The book starts off explaining how Russian is pronounced, from a linguistic standpoint. I don't think that it over-complicates it. In this sense, the first few chapters of this book hit a supremely perfect mix of practical information on Russian linguistics and pronunciation. The way that this book explains Russian pronunciation is truly gold. I have looked through dozens of the best books, and none of them even come close. I have also studied (over) six languages, and no materials in any other course has come close.

It would serve you well not to bother learning "older" vocabulary, such as words related to collective farming (assuming it exists, as other posts claim), which, honestly, even appears in the best post-Soviet era books (though perhaps not in the "learn Russian while having fun with your friends!" books). But be careful when calling words "outdated," which means that a word is no longer used because it has been replaced by another word. Very few words in this book, if any, are actually "outdated."
Mejora
I used this book at Harvard. It was heavy on the grammar, which is perhaps not altogether unexpected for an inflected language such as Russian. In addition to being a course book, it tried to have a reference function by trying, as far as practicable, to give you everything relating to a topic, for example, adjectives, in the same chapter or two. It made the course somewhat arid, but after finishing the book, one had a very sound grip on Russian grammar and knew where to look up any topic one was not sure about.

At the same time, the vocabulary remained limited. The reason, apparently, lay in a philosophy of teaching that the first Russian course should lay a thorough foundation of grammar, the second should provide high-frequency vocabulary (we used Nina Khavronina's "Russian as we speak it" and Karpovich's "Lecture on Russian history", plus selections from various newspapers/magazines), while after that one should learn the specialized vocabulary of one's particular field, be it history, economics, philosophy, or whatever.
Bremar
I had this book for First Year Russian. It's probably not the best book for beginning Russian. It's somewhat old with no pictures, games, cultural information, or the other types of things you might find in a modern textbook. However, it did the trick and helped to propel me into what would eventually become my major in college.