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Download By the El epub

by Lothar Stelter,Joe Cunningham,Lawrence Stelter




This is a handsomely produced paperback of vivid photos and old-timers' reminiscences of the Third Avenue Elevated trains that dominated the skyline of Manhattan and the Bronx. Its 200+ full-color photos are mostly from the years shortly before the El was abandoned in 1953 -- divided between pictures of the trains and stations, and the urban life that teemed under and around them. The pictures show neighborhoods filled with mom-and-pop stores, among them a striking number of bars and pawn shops. Street life is well chronicled, and most East Side landmarks (e.g., the Empire State and Chrysler Buildings) feature prominently. Some of the most dramatic photos show the demolition of the elevated structures. The book will appeal to amateur (and maybe professional) historians of New York city's general history and culture, as well as to railroad and mass-transit buffs. The book has the endorsement of the New York City Transit Museum and The Bronx County Historical Society. (It was the subway and elevated train system that directly led to the development of The Bronx by making the remote borough accessible to the business center of New York, downtown.) Joe Franklin, the venerable nostaglist to whose radio program nearly every New Yorker used to listen faithfully, wrote an introduction. So did officials of the transit museum and Bronx historical society. The photos have all been newly digitized and restored to their original vivid colors.
Download By the El epub
ISBN: 0977722015
ISBN13: 978-0977722013
Category: No category
Author: Lothar Stelter,Joe Cunningham,Lawrence Stelter
Publisher: Stelterfoto LLC; Second edition (August 15, 2007)
Pages: 132 pages
ePUB size: 1652 kb
FB2 size: 1790 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 528
Other Formats: mobi lrf mobi txt

Landamath
Having been born and raised on the corner of 3rd. Ave. and 50th. St. in Midtown Manhattan throughout the 1940's and 50's, this book brought back such fond memories. As a 10 yr old in 1954 I vividly remember the last northbound train heading up the line and the conductor blowing his horn and the passangers with party horns blowing them out the windows. A real "Party Atmosphere". It's so hard to beleive that next year 2014, will mark 60 years since that event. A great book, and a great memory.
Samowar
BEAUTIFUL BOOK. TO YOUNG TO REMEMBER THE 3RD AVENUE EL
BUT THE PHOTOS ARE VERY EVOCATIVE OF AN EARLIER NYC.
Unsoo
Wonderful story with pictures of the last days of the Third Avenue El. Great for anyone interested in life along the El during the 50's
Kegal
What a wonderful treasure for any New Yorker, particulalry fans of the City's incredible mass transit system. This book should be in print forever!
Braswyn
Great book. Loved all the old time pictures. This happened before my time, but it is great to see how the city was back then. I recommend it.
Jairani
Great text and photos!
Zololmaran
An extraordinarily interesting book for a New Yorker born in 1947, who remembers the el from his childhood.
I admit that initially, I had a look at this book because I know the author - curiosity got hold of me, and I asked him if I could have a gander. Thankfully, I have a deep appreciation for transit history - I am always eager to pick up new information, particularly where New York City's public transportation system is concerned. I had no idea of how thankful I would be, simply by opening the first page.

This book is nothing short of a treasure trove of photographs and information on the Third Avenue El - its final years of operation and subsequent demolition. The photographs of Lothar Stelter are absolutely beautiful - there is an equal balance of documentary and aesthetic character to them. Details are captured and celebrated, along with a wonderful sense of composition, light and feeling. Lawrence Stelter's written history, leading north along the El's itinerary of stops, is thorough and enjoyable - I particularly enjoy his way of relating the information regarding the transit system to the surrounding elements of New York City, and the era's culture in general. What I really love about the book is that it is a shared, loving collaboration between father and son - both are passionate about the subject matter, and the contribution of each meshes perfectly with that of the other.

I would recommend this for transit buffs, NYC history fanatics, architecture lovers, and those with an appreciation for wonderful photography. It is, simply put, a thoroughly delightful book - visually delightful, as well as historically informative. You can tell that a lot of passion was put into it, which only makes it that much more enjoyable.