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by Susan Gubar




With a little help from Virginia Woolf, Susan Gubar contemplates startling transformations produced by the women's movement in recent decades. What advances have women made and what still needs to be done? Taking Woolf's classic A Room of One's Own as her guide, Gubar engages these questions by recounting one year in the life of an English professor.

A meditation on the teaching of literature and on the state of the humanities today, her chapters also provide a crash course on the challenges and changes in feminist intellectual history over the past several decades: the influence of post-structuralism and of critical race, postcolonial, and cultural studies scholarship; the stakes of queer theory and the institutionalization of women's studies; and the effects of globalism and bioengineering on conversations about gender, sex, and sexuality. Yet Rooms of Our Own eschews a scholarly approach. Instead, through narrative criticism it enlists a thoroughly contemporary cast of characters who tell us as much about the comedies and tragedies of campus life today as they do about the sometimes contentious but invariably liberating feminisms of our future.

Download Rooms of Our Own epub
ISBN: 0252073797
ISBN13: 978-0252073793
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Author: Susan Gubar
Language: English
Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1 edition (August 30, 2006)
Pages: 256 pages
ePUB size: 1384 kb
FB2 size: 1174 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 129
Other Formats: doc txt mobi docx

Sinredeemer
Great book.
Voodoogore
In this avowedly experimental book, Susan Gubar engages the problems and polemics of feminism in the form of a campus novel. It's a brilliant conceit, and the experiment pays off: she is able to write accessibly and dangerously about debates that are often hidden by veils of jargon and political correctness.

The inspiration is Woolf, but the imitation isn't "slavish": it owes as much to "Lucky Jim" and David Lodge. And while the humour is a matter of taste - I found it delightful - the choice of form is not capricious: in a moving coda, Gubar explains why it would have been impossible to say what she has to say in conventional academic style.

If you are interested in the state of feminism, in the place of women in the academy, or you just want a taste of academic life, you couldn't find a more honest, perceptive and enjoyable read.