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Download The Guardship (The Brethren of the Coast #1) (Book 1) epub

by James L Nelson




Shortly after Thomas Marlowe's arrival in Williamsburg, Virginia, all in that newfound capital city are speaking his name. With the bounty from his years as a pirate--a life he intends to renounce and keep forever secret--he purchases a fine plantation from a striking young widow, and soon after kills the favorite son of one of Virginia's most powerful clans while defending her honor. But it is a daring feat of remarkable cunning that truly sets local tongues wagging: a stunning move that wins Marlowe command of Plymouth Prize, the colony's decrepit guardship.

But even as the enigmatic Marlowe bravely leads the King's sailors in bloody pitched battle against the cutthroats who infest the waters off Virginia's shores, a threat from his illicit past looms on the horizon that could doom Marlowe and his plans. Jean-Pierre LeRois, captain of the Vengeance--a brigand notorious even among other brigands for his violence and debauchery--plots to seize the colony's wealth, forcing Marlowe to choose between losing all or facing the one man he fears. Only an explosive confrontation on the open sea can determine whether the Chesapeake will be ruled by the crown or the Brethren of the Coast.

Shortly after Thomas Marlowe's arrival in Williamsburg, Virginia, all in that newfound capital city are speaking his name. With the bounty from his years as a pirate--a life he intends to renounce and keep forever secret--he purchases a fine plantation from a striking young widow, and soon after kills the favorite son of one of Virginia's most powerful clans while defending her honor. But it is a daring feat of remarkable cunning that truly sets local tongues wagging: a stunning move that wins Marlowe command of Plymouth Prize, the colony's decrepit guardship.

But even as the enigmatic Marlowe bravely leads the King's sailors in bloody pitched battle against the cutthroats who infest the waters off Virginia's shores, a threat from his illicit past looms on the horizon that could doom Marlowe and his plans. Jean-Pierre LeRois, captain of the Vengeance--a brigand notorious even among other brigands for his violence and debauchery--plots to seize the colony's wealth, forcing Marlowe to choose between losing all or facing the one man he fears. Only an explosive confrontation on the open sea can determine whether the Chesapeake will be ruled by the crown or the Brethren of the Coast.

Download The Guardship (The Brethren of the Coast #1) (Book 1) epub
ISBN: 0380804522
ISBN13: 978-0380804528
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Author: James L Nelson
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (January 5, 2000)
Pages: 372 pages
ePUB size: 1433 kb
FB2 size: 1302 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 579
Other Formats: docx lrf azw txt

Redfury
To begin with, I actually started reading the third book in this series, thinking it was the first. About 80% into it, I realized my mistake and bought this one. I thought I would have learned too much, having read a good chunk of the final novel. Fortunately, that was not the case. There really was not a ton that was given away. If anything, I learned some great background knowledge.

Secondly, I bought the book because of the author. Nelson wrote the Fin Gall series, which I absolutely enjoyed. Discovering this series about pirates, I readily could not wait. And I was not disappointed. Nelson does such a wonderful job of weaving together different complications. It is not confusing. I will say the diction for this novel, compared to the last, is much more elevated; a lot of ship terms that can be a little confusing but nothing that interrupts the plot.

I am loving this series and am just about done with the second one. Enjoy!
Mikale
I have read all of the Kindle books by James L. Nelson that I could find: The Norsemen Saga series (6 books); The Brethren of the Coast series (3 books); The French Prize; and Full Fathom Five.
Although I am no historian, it seems that there is much historical authenticity to his novels. His descriptions are sufficiently vivid so to implant visions of the scenes that he paints with his narrative. The stories are alive with portraits of his characters and the reader is able to ascribe well-known traits to these characters, even when the subtle nuance of treachery is mentioned. Regarding nautical authenticity, the author is apparently an accomplished sailor and likely spent time before the mast.
I have read these books with immense satisfaction and would love to see, or should I say “hear,” more of them with Audible narration. I eagerly await a sequel to Full Fathom Five.
Terr
Nelson’s writing has a nice flow. Nothing jarring. You open the cover like a carved front door, and you are kindly escorted all the way to the epilogue. ‘‘Tis a fine story, and Nelson is an even finer storyteller. Like a good cup of strong coffee, it was good to the last drop. And sailing has its own vocabulary, so if you are one to befuddle your yachtly buddies, you’ll get a twofer when you join the “Brethren of the Coast”.
Gralmeena
I read James Nelson's Norseman series; Fin Gall, Dubh Gall and Lord of Viklo and loved them. That's why I decided to try another Nelson series. But I had a hard time getting into this book and almost abandoned it a couple of times. I forced myself to keep going and at the 70% point I finally got interested. Maybe it was just because the setting was not what I typically am interested in. I don't plan to read the other installments in this series.
iSlate
Overall, the book is fairly good. It is a story set in 1701 colonial tidewater Virginia, at a time when piracy was a common problem. To quote from David Stick in "Graveyard of the Atlantic" (Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1952), "There were pirates too - Blackbeard, Stede Bonnet, Anne Bonny, and Calico Jack Rackam, to name a few - who rendezvoused behind the isolated islands of the outer banks, sailed out from there to attack merchant vessels, and returned again to celebrate and fight over their loot and maybe bury some of it behind the ever-shifting dunes. Between them, the pirates were as much a menace for a time as the winds and tides and shoals." The writing starts out somewhat badly as you seem to walk into the middle of a story without an introduction, and the author apparently read a little too much Shakespeare as he uses some archaic words and phrases (although that does not seem to continue through the main part of the book). As in other of his books, the author loses track of details, e.g., he starts with a ball at the governor's mansion (giving a good description of the present day restored mansion) and later indicates that the mansion had not yet been built (where is his editor?). Once things get moving, the plot carries along nicely and fits the context of the time period. Thomas Marlowe has created a new identity for himself in Williamsburg, but his attraction to the widow Elizabeth Tinling brings him into conflict with the powerful Wilkenson family. Neither Marlowe nor the Wilkensons are completely above board, both having shady dealings and hidden resources, as their rivalry leads them to actions that would ruin an ordinary honest person (the scenario about the tobacco was used by Ken Follett in "A Place Called Freedom"). Marlowe faces unexpected danger when past associates show up on the scene. Various people suffer from the consequences of the resulting battle, but some people carry potentially embarrassing knowledge with them to the grave. The sex and violence would give the book an R rating.