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by Paki S. Wright




Black comedy about a sassy, afflicted Greenwich Village adolescent, raised by free-loving, radical Reichians during the uptight McCarthy era. A suicide attempt leads to the infinitely bizarre All Souls? Waiting Room, where all souls go for re-routing in between lives.
Download The All Souls' Waiting Room epub
ISBN: 0759656185
ISBN13: 978-0759656185
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Author: Paki S. Wright
Language: English
Publisher: 1st Book Library (March 1, 2002)
Pages: 236 pages
ePUB size: 1719 kb
FB2 size: 1672 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 528
Other Formats: mbr lrf lrf azw

zmejka
This unique creative work explores the impact of Reich, Freud, and Jung on the parenting of a young, only child growing up in New York City. All is told through the eyes of death by suicide. What should be a depressing, dark story ends up being filled with comic humor and sensitivity. Life's frailties hang in the balance as Wright carries us along to the shores of learning and hope. The teenage themes of 'to be or not to be'..to 'to live or not to live' are woven with a wild daring to be fully alive and the maturity of acceptance. A reading journey worth taking.
The All Souls' Waiting Room
Mopimicr
For me to enjoy a book, I have to be pulled in during the first or second chapter. So far that hasn't happened with this book. I have not finished reading it. It may get better, but what I have read so far just doesn't reel me into the story.
Faebei
Thank you, Ms. Wright, for this beautiful story! I could not put The All-Souls' Waiting Room down and devoured it in a weekend. While the story takes place in the 1950's/60's and reflects social culture of that time, the book's overall message is timeless. We are truly victims of victims. With this understanding, can we forgive? Can we not just survive, but live, love and move forward? Is there comfort in the fact there is a much, much larger spiritual picture? The All-Souls' Waiting Room is a "must read!" Love you, Paki S. Wright!!!
Samardenob
In the 1930s, 40s, and 50s the Summerhill School of A.S. Neill and the writings of psychoanalyst/natural scientist Wilhelm Reich led a great many Americans to try raising their children in a more "self-regulating" manner. Wright was one of those children, and her tale is profoundly moving from beginning to end, as a celebration of what was good in ideas about self-regulation as well as a cautionary tale of how those ideas were abused. For, indeed, many adults, well-intentioned but not sufficiently aware of their own problems and need to control their children, used such ideas as yet one more tool to unconsciously impose their own will upon kids. (Similarly, many of the "Summerhill schools" that started up in the US in the 1960s only to fizzle out or worse, seem to have done as much harm as good for some of the kids who went to them.)
This has left the impression with a lot of today's generation of parents that such "free school" or "Free child" ideas are muddle-headed nonsense, one of the legacies of the crazy, irresponsible Sixties that is better off forgotten. Paki Wright's brave book, though dealing in a remarkably frank way with the mistakes made by the adults around her, does not seek any such simple formula for dismissing the truly important things she got from how she was raised. We watch her move through her adolescent phase of blaming the adult world, on into the maturity that recognizes their shortcomings as well as their sincere intentions and the truly valuable strengths they helped cultivate in her.
As a fascinating insider's view into one group of admirers of Reich, the book gives remarkable new insight into the struggle between Reich's work and the United States government that set out to brutally crush it. With the government-sponsored Nazi-like burning of Reich's books in 1956, and the imprisonment and killing of Reich in 1957, the child Wright watches as many of the adults in her world go down in that shipwreck. And then, like Peter Reich in his BOOK OF DREAMS, she has to grow up and make sense of the terrible events she witnessed and was part of.
Usanner
The storyline of The All Souls' Waiting Room is a frank and eye-opening look into the child-rearing techniques of Wilhelm Reich as interpreted by the adults who raised a now young-adult and suicidal Johnnine, the main character of the book. As a child of the 1950s when parents ruled and children had no recourse, I immediately connected with Johnnine's story and the results of the perhaps well-intended but spirit-damaging way of growing up that was inflicted upon her.

Wright draws vivid imagery with her words, allowing the reader to experience her story in great depth. Her style and hard-hitting honesty made this my summer's "couldn't put it down" read. Moments of humor do well to offset the grim details of the main character's childhood, which could otherwise be difficult to take in.

I loved this quirky, sobering and well-written book...makes me hope for more - both a continuation of Johnnine's story and anything else Wright wants to share. Her website - bohemianbuddhistreview.com - features a great collection of her current musings and never fails to give me a smile and something to think about. But it's like trying to fill up on appetizers when I'm hankering for an entree...bring it on!
Acrobat
This real-life story blends with a fantastical experience that looks at life and death from new perspectives, esp. for the young woman involved. I was both highly amused by her macabre sense of humor, and appalled at her childhood treatment by supposedly intelligent adults who were determined to mold her into the "perfect Reichian child", whatever that means. Loved the bits with the shrinks arguing back and forth, but could've lived without the operatic cherubs (and maybe even the Akashic Recorder, kind of a creepy dude who doesn't do much except observe the proceedings). The book does leave you with a strong sense of optimism about life, in spite of its inevitable painful drawbacks, and I'd recommend All Souls to anyone who likes razor-sharp writing, strong characters, and a moving plot, especially anyone dealing with ideas about suicide! [Spoiler alert: it doesn't work.]