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Download Green Hills of Africa epub

by Wolfram Kandinsky,Ernest Hemingway




A 1930s African jungle safari as recorded in the journal of Ernest Hemingway describes the glory of the landscape while bringing to life the story of a land under threat of human incursion.
Download Green Hills of Africa epub
ISBN: 0736656758
ISBN13: 978-0736656757
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics
Author: Wolfram Kandinsky,Ernest Hemingway
Language: English
Publisher: Books on Tape; Unabridged edition (May 1, 2001)
ePUB size: 1605 kb
FB2 size: 1935 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 169
Other Formats: mobi rtf doc docx

Samowar
I enjoy Hemingway and the reader's voice is perfect. One major complaint is the volume. I listen to it in the car when I drive to work. The reader does numerous voices. When he speaks as Hemingway, his voice is normal. When he changes to another character it's very loud, I guess to emphasize that the character speaking has changed. So I am constantly turning the volume up and down and I miss a lot of what Hemingway is saying. It's a shame, because if not for that I'd give it 5 stars. If listening at home without background sounds, this might not be a problem.
Bele
This new expanded edition brings one of Ernest Hemingway's least read works to the public using the original jacket art and fine illustrations of the first edition. While the writing is masterful, and the hunting tale enduring, of special interest are the appendices. For me, the most delightful surprise was Pauline Hemingway's safari journal, her day to day observations provide a perfect complement to her husband's novelistic account.
Fenrikasa
I wanted to like Green Hills of Africa by Ernest Hemingway but I found it more boring than exciting. I have read Death in the Afternoon by him and it was a brilliant book in the whole sense of the word. This one lacks the entertainment value I was hoping to find reading about safari life in Africa. Surely has its moments but mostly they are all sitting by the fireside and long blocks of dialogue with Papa?, back and forth, forth and back, and less and less describing the wild life of the immense region that is Africa. I do not contest the fact that Hemingway has been in more exotic places than most of us can ever hope to be, for he strikes me as even royalty in some cases the way he thinks and acts. I am glad I bought this book used together with another book on the subject of safaris. The other one was heads and tails so much full of life and situations compared to this one. I guess he earned a living even while on vacation and documenting his itineraries was profitable enough. When he was on Africa he wrote of the place, when in Spain he wrote some masterpieces about that place as well. He gets started with dialogue that seem to me self aggrandizing, too full of himself and that is when is time to tune in to animal planet. Average reading for an obviously talented writer, a powerhouse of world wide recognition. I thought this book was going to be quite a book but I found myself skipping more and more pages. Don't have time to admire the name of a famous writer if the the story does not merit it. 3 Stars.
Dead Samurai
First time since 1978 in Boise. Just read the book, not the scholarly apparatus. It's a chapbook of technique for how to tell a story when much of the time there's no story going on. The casual racism is hard to take and will bother modern readers, as will the casual slaughter of wildlife for the sake of collecting a trophy for your wall. Hemingway is dating badly and was more a creature of his time than his fans like to admit, and his mind is often juvenile. All that said, there is something great about this book, and Hemingway's great artistry rescues the enterprise.
nadness
A classic. I read it when we were in Tanzania, because it describes some of the same places we visited. The descriptions are vivid, although he big-game hunting is rather dated. This is pure Hemingway -- full of himself, yet massively talented. If you can tolerate the hunting and the undiluted machismo, there are some brilliant stylistic passages that evocatively capture a bygone era.
Usishele
I have always liked Hemingway.. however this gave me a different angle.. killing so many beautiful animals every day, what a terrible thing to do.. even he mentions that it wont last.. that hunting became tourism .. but he did it anyway.. not good... trophy ;hunting and for what... just for a bit of short term pleasure... while killing off species..
Tholmeena
An unvarnished and evocative narrative of a extensive safari completed just before the rains and punctuated by strong drinks and diverting conversations and characters. The surrounding ever shifting landscape is always the central character.
One of the greatest hunting stories ever told...and probably one of Hemingway's finest works. Hard-edged, haunting, and lyrical...that rarest of rare books: a thinking man's (or woman's) hunting book. If you don't like hunting stories, this is probably not going to be your cup of tea...but, if you've ever walked the hills with a rifle or dreamed of an Africa now long gone, this is a must read.