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Download That's Hollywood: A behind-the-scenes look at 60 of the greatest films ever made epub

by Peter Van Gelder




Download That's Hollywood: A behind-the-scenes look at 60 of the greatest films ever made epub
ISBN: 0060551984
ISBN13: 978-0060551988
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Movies
Author: Peter Van Gelder
Language: English
Publisher: HarperPerennial; 1st edition (1990)
Pages: 288 pages
ePUB size: 1789 kb
FB2 size: 1858 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 440
Other Formats: docx lrf txt mbr

Mave
This book is very dated. I mean honestly, Batman as one of the all time greatest films? Some of the selections are truly laughable. The book itself, is extremely dated, and does not hold up well, simply because its selection of greatest films is poor. Look for something more recent, I would recommend 1,001 Films You Must See Before You Die.
Hilarious Kangaroo
That’s Hollywood

Peter Van Gelder lists his opinions of “the Greatest Films of All Time”. All are in English, as if the rest of the world didn’t exist. The ‘Contents’ list the movies in alphabetical order, not by date. The ‘Index’ is on pages 284 to 288. These are interesting articles on these movies. Why only sixty movies? Books like “The Military 100” or “The Legal 100” use a larger (and arbitrary) number. Was that number picked to fit into 300 pages? In 1955 the movie “To Hell and Back” was the greatest earning movie until “Jaws” in 1975. But the dollar count does not take into the price of the admissions. Neither are listed here, which tells you something about his selections. Both were based on true events. “Frankenstein” is listed here, but not “Dracula” or “The Wolfman”. Horror movies are popular during an economic depression, or uncertain times (the outer space invasions in the 1950s). You might expect something nowadays (those Vampire shows on TV). Most movie theaters have gone out of business around here. Renting a DVD overnight is cheaper than a single ticket. Those Wolfman movies were said to symbolize the economy - some good times followed by bad times. Or represent people who have a hidden evil side.

Van Gelder praises the 1941 “The Maltese Falcon” but the original 1931 version is better. Watch it and see for yourself. The 1935 version (“Satan Met A Lady”) was later re-titled “Dangerous Female” to distinguish it from the remake. The 1941 version seems more cartoon-ish, the 1931 version has a more realistic ending for the villains [the lack of Hollywood censorship?]. The actor who played “Miles Archer” seemed more believable, so too his wife “Iva”. The story of a private detective looking for a missing person then finding other problems is similar to such novels as “The Big Sleep”, “Farewell, My Lovely”, and “The Lady in the Lake”. Bogart played another hero who lost his love in “Casablanca”. Its political references may be lost to many today. It isn’t much of a story. So Laszlo escaped from captivity by the Gestapo? Its more likely he agreed to become a double-agent to get out of Dachau. Van Gelder mistakes the rocker panels for the rocker covers in “The French Connection”.

This book lacks “The Sands of Iwo Jima”, which is also educational. So too “The Asphalt Jungle”, the story of a perfect crime which fails because it is perfect (like “Goodfellas”). Greed overcomes the gang as they have no prior connections. This never happened to the James Gang. “High Noon” marked the end of the traditional Western, which dealt with the economic rivalry between a big corporate rancher and small farmers or homesteaders. A town Marshal was an elected position, like the Sheriff of the county. He would have his hired Deputies and the support of most people who voted for him. People could join a posse readily to defend their home town. While “Shane” isn’t included here, it is a better example of the traditional Western even if it avoids the traditional collective action of the settlers. You can compare it to the townsmen of Northfield Minnesota against the James Gang. [Any bank robbery deprived the local area of the money used to conduct business.]

So read or browse these articles for an education on another point of view
Leniga
That’s Hollywood

Peter Van Gelder lists his opinions of “the Greatest Films of All Time”. All are in English, as if the rest of the world didn’t exist. The ‘Contents’ list the movies in alphabetical order, not by date. The ‘Index’ is on pages 284 to 288. These are interesting articles on these movies. Why only sixty movies? Books like “The Military 100” or “The Legal 100” use a larger (and arbitrary) number. Was that number picked to fit into 300 pages? In 1955 the movie “To Hell and Back” was the greatest earning movie until “Jaws” in 1975. But the dollar count does not take into the price of the admissions. Neither are listed here, which tells you something about his selections. Both were based on true events. “Frankenstein” is listed here, but not “Dracula” or “The Wolfman”. Horror movies are popular during an economic depression, or uncertain times (the outer space invasions in the 1950s). You might expect something nowadays (those Vampire shows on TV). Most movie theaters have gone out of business around here. Renting a DVD overnight is cheaper than a single ticket. Those Wolfman movies were said to symbolize the economy - some good times followed by bad times. Or represent people who have a hidden evil side.

Van Gelder praises the 1941 “The Maltese Falcon” but the original 1931 version is better. Watch it and see for yourself. The 1935 version (“Satan Met A Lady”) was later re-titled “Dangerous Female” to distinguish it from the remake. The 1941 version seems more cartoon-ish, the 1931 version has a more realistic ending for the villains [the lack of Hollywood censorship?]. The actor who played “Miles Archer” seemed more believable, so too his wife “Iva”. The story of a private detective looking for a missing person then finding other problems is similar to such novels as “The Big Sleep”, “Farewell, My Lovely”, and “The Lady in the Lake”. Bogart played another hero who lost his love in “Casablanca”. Its political references may be lost to many today. It isn’t much of a story. So Laszlo escaped from captivity by the Gestapo? Its more likely he agreed to become a double-agent to get out of Dachau. Van Gelder mistakes the rocker panels for the rocker covers in “The French Connection”.

This book lacks “The Sands of Iwo Jima”, which is also educational. So too “The Asphalt Jungle”, the story of a perfect crime which fails because it is perfect (like “Goodfellas”). Greed overcomes the gang as they have no prior connections. This never happened to the James Gang. “High Noon” marked the end of the traditional Western, which dealt with the economic rivalry between a big corporate rancher and small farmers or homesteaders. A town Marshal was an elected position, like the Sheriff of the county. He would have his hired Deputies and the support of most people who voted for him. People could join a posse readily to defend their home town. While “Shane” isn’t included here, it is a better example of the traditional Western even if it avoids the traditional collective action of the settlers. You can compare it to the townsmen of Northfield Minnesota against the James Gang. [Any bank robbery deprived the local area of the money used to conduct business.]

So read or browse these articles for an education on another point of view.