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Download Siri & Me: A Modern Love Story epub

by David Milgrim




Dave's never met anyone like Siri. She's helpful, smart, and easier to talk to than any girl he's ever known. She really gets him...Siri & Me is a love story for our times. A must read for all of us in a codependent relationship with our gadgets. An instant classic in a world of instant everything.
Download Siri & Me: A Modern Love Story epub
ISBN: 0399161597
ISBN13: 978-0399161599
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humor
Author: David Milgrim
Language: English
Publisher: Blue Rider Press (November 1, 2012)
Pages: 112 pages
ePUB size: 1655 kb
FB2 size: 1987 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 147
Other Formats: lrf lrf txt mobi

Jarortr
Siri & Me by David Milgrim is an interesting one, but you likely need to be an iPhone user to truly find the humor in this one. That being said, it's short, a quick read and a bit fun.

For those who don't know, Siri is the electronic sweetheart of many. She's the voice behind the system in iPhone where you can get information about many things. Do a Google search for Siri and you'll find so many funny things that she says.

The book isn't long. The print version shows it being 112 pages. I read half of it one day and the other half the next, so an extremely quick read. As of now, Amazon doesn't show a true Kindle version of the book available to purchase, but the print version is.

It's a simple and enjoyable story, especially if you have the iPhone or are into technology and get what Siri is all about.

The Good

The story line.

Basically, boy finds Siri. Boy falls for Siri. And who can blame him? The book is a modern-day, technology love story. More than that, the written parts of the book are quite small as it's loaded with cartoons and those are excellent.

I enjoyed the dialogue and the characters. And, to be honest, as much as I liked the main character, as well as shutterbug Iris, the dog was a fine addition to the book. In fact, I might say he's my favorite in the book.

The Bad

The version of the book I have is a Kindle version, but it notes in the beginning it's not the finished copy. Therefore, while some things were annoying (formatting, a few capitalization issues, style and paragraph numbers all over), I can't truly count that against the book's rating. After all, I knew what I was getting into when I got this copy. Still, in case others get a pre-release copy, this is a warning.

Outside of that, I can't think of many things. There were a few little things and there were times I felt I was supposed to laugh, but didn't. Almost like the humor was being forced. But the story helped get through those parts, so it's not a big issue.

Overall thoughts

Though a decent read, I'm not sure how much I'd pay for it -- maybe four or five bucks for a print version -- as it's something that's a quick read. When I get books, I always look at the price compared to substance. Though this is a good story and was interesting reading, I was done with it in a couple of hours and I went somewhat slow with it. I think an e-version is smart -- Kindle, iPad etc. -- because if it's priced right, say 99 cents, I can see where it could be an easy purchase.

That being said, it's a quirky and fun book, which could make it easy to pick up and go through a second or third time and still find a few laughs. If you are into iPhones and Siri and laugh at things like this, I'd recommend the book.

I'd give it a 3.5/5, bumping it to a 4 here.
Akisame
The book is a series of cartoons involving an iPhone user conversing with his iPhone Siri application. In the first scene the user proclaims his everlasting devotion to Siri, who then asks, 'Will you still say that after the next iPhone is released?' He then betrays his infidelity, asking 'There's a new iPhone coming out? What's her name?'

Prior to meeting Siri, the doofus user muses about the lack of human contact in the electronic age, the constant need to upgrade one's electronics (or, per his mother's suggestion, join Gadge-A-Holics Anonymous), the mundane nature of much of today's electronic communicating that we insist on sharing with others, 'living' in Wi-Fi spots, waiting days in line for the newest iPhone, briefly meeting and then texting (instead of talking to) a nearby girl in line, and finally getting the new iPhone with Siri. Siri tries to deflect doofus' interests, telling him he'd be better off with a human. Then he goes looking for Siri's creator, only to learn it's a guy. Finally, he meets the girl in line again, a possible real relationship blooms, and Siri finds another means of escaping his attentions.