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Download A Short History of Canada - Revised epub

by Desmond Morton




“Canadians believe that their history is short, boring and irrelevant. They are wrong on all counts.” – Desmond Morton, from the IntroductionMost of us know bits and pieces of our history but would like to be more sure of how it all fits together. The trick is to find a history that is so absorbing you will want to read it from beginning to end. With this completely revised and expanded edition of A Short History of Canada, Desmond Morton, one of Canada’s most noted and highly respected historians, shows how the choices we can make at the dawn of the 21st century have been shaped by history.Morton is keenly aware of the links connecting our present, our past, and our future, and in one compact and engrossing volume he pulls off the remarkable feat of bringing it all together – from the First Nations before the arrival of the Europeans to the failure of the Charlottetown accord and Jean Chretien’s third term as prime minister. His acute observations on the Diefenbaker era, the effects of the post-war influx of immigrants, the flag debate, the baby boom, the Trudeau years and the constitutional crisis, the Quebec referendum, and the rise of the Canadian Alliance all provide an invaluable background to understanding the way Canada works today.
Download A Short History of Canada - Revised epub
ISBN: 0771065167
ISBN13: 978-0771065163
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Author: Desmond Morton
Language: English
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; 2nd Rev edition (September 1, 1994)
Pages: 352 pages
ePUB size: 1796 kb
FB2 size: 1594 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 187
Other Formats: mbr azw docx mobi

Cobyno
Should be called "A Short History of Canadian Politics" - that's what it's about. And for that perspective of history, it's very good. But in being billed as "History of Canada", it falls short. Even with the politicians and details of the political parties, it assumes you already know something about each and it provides more detail, context, background, etc.
Again - if this is the slice of Canadian history that you're looking for, then it's and excellent book.
But if you're looking for a bull "History of Canada", keep looking.
INvait
Many Americans know little about the history of their northern neighbour (for example, how many of you knew that Newfoundland was a British protectorate until 1949?). This volume shows how Canadian history transpired from the nineteenth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. The author examines economic, political, and social events, as well as foreign policy--he presents a Canadian perspective on the U.S. Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. Morton goes into detail about Canadian elections down to the breakdown of seats by party in Parliament, and the author shows how many of the social trends in America in the latter half of the 20th century also took place in Canada. Those who wish to get a basic understanding of Canadian history would do well to read Desmond Morton's informative history.
Steelrunner
It was interesting historical read. A few well placed maps would have helped understand the many references made in the book. I knew very little about Canada's history so I did not understand some of the commentary.
Fegelv
This work would appeal most to people who already know the general history of Canada and enjoy being filled in about the personalities. Telling about these movers and sharpers is the book's strength. The main issues and general movements can get lost in the personality descriptions. That gives the book a detailed aspect that makes it hard to see the larger picture and the major moments of Canada's history. Still, enlightening for a U S citizen.
Manona
Summary: If not Canadian, do not read only this book. For a clearer understanding of Canada, supplement it with a secondary education history textbook.

Cons:
The author appears at times to be Canadian, Canadien or American because his writing style states historical events with a very specific point of view typically describing events in Ontario/Montreal with minute detail while making sweeping generalizations about events that occur in other cities or provinces or simply ignoring them. One can assume that the center of his universe revolves around Ontario or Quebec.
The author is clearly Canadian as the writing style assumes that geographic locations, historical political affiliations, and historical people are already known so that introductions are not needed.
The author is clearly a history professor or student with a similar background so something clear to him needs no explanation but he's so deep in his knowledge that he really has no idea what is currently taught so topics are often introduced with little or no back story which causes the reader to pause and search on Wikipedia.
The subject matter is not discussed using a time line so thoughts move forward and back at the author's leisure. This can be jarring to the reader.

Pros:
The author makes quaint observations regarding human behavior throughout the book such as "in good times muck smells like fertilizer."
The author provides historical insights likely stricken from current historical texts such as " women's organizations ... distributing white feathers as symbols of cowardice to healthy young civilian men." or "by May 1915, public clamour had forced the government to intern more than seven thousand mostly harmless people."
Meztihn
Not "text book" style writing. Very insightful. Highly recommend for anybody interested in Canadian History. A must read for any history buff or casual reader.
Tehn
This book is a concise history of Canada dealing mostly with from the times of European settlement until the date of its writing. It focuses mostly on the political history, bringing up names of important politicians along with laws and other documents that have shaped the Canadian story. The coverage of such a long history in such a short book requires that matter be quickly dealt with. Perhaps a more modern Canadian history (my copy goes to 1987) would include more information about First Nations. I do recommend this for readers searching for a quick overview of Canadian political history.