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Download Infectious Connections: How Short-Term Foodborne Infections Can Lead to Long-Term Health Problems epub

by Beatrice Trum Hunter




This book can help you avoid one of the most common sources of illness today. Outbreaks from contaminated beef, peanuts, pistachios, spinach, jalapeno peppers, tomatoes, and other common foods are striking with an alarming frequency. Every year one-quarter of our population is sickened by contaminated foods, with many hospitalizations and deaths. Factory farming, imported foods,weak federal regulations and few inspections provide oppotunites for new foodborne pathogens to emerge and for firmly established ones to become more virulent. These infectious microbes can move from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and can localize anywhere, such as in the lungs, genitourinary tract, soft tissues, central nervous system, joints, bones, or heart valves, where they inflict serious damage. Drawing from government documents, scientific journals, and medical reports, Beatrice Trum Hunter profiles more than a dozen major foodborne infections and their likely sources. She identifies signs and symptoms, people at high risk, and ways to prevent these infections. A safer food supply from farm to fork involves the entire food chain, from farmers, regulators and inspectors, to distriubtors, retailers, and all food preparers, including you.
Download Infectious Connections: How Short-Term Foodborne Infections Can Lead to Long-Term Health Problems epub
ISBN: 1591202442
ISBN13: 978-1591202448
Category: Fitness
Subcategory: Nutrition
Author: Beatrice Trum Hunter
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Health Publications, Inc.; 1st edition (July 15, 2009)
Pages: 441 pages
ePUB size: 1352 kb
FB2 size: 1693 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 231
Other Formats: txt azw lrf mobi

anneli
This is an extremely important and thoroughly researched book - a must to read, in my opinion. Beatrice Trum Hunter covers everything. She is a wonder.
Kerry
In our modern industrial society the incidence of chronic illness is increasing at an alarming rate. Many of the disease conditions we are being faced with supposedly have no known definitive tests or specific causes and mostly only the symptoms of disease are being treated. In order to stem the tide of this very serious trend we need to focus more deliberately on the root causes of chronic illness so we can prevent and treat more effectively.

In her book “Infectious Connections”, Beatrice Trum Hunter thoroughly addresses one of the main causes of chronic degenerative disease….. food-borne infections. Most people think of the symptoms caused by food poisoning as acute, sometimes serious or even life threatening, but usually short lived. As a general rule we fail to connect acute infections caused by pathogenic microbes….with symptoms which appear further down the road. Unfortunately these infectious connections are often not thought of or sometimes are even intentionally ignored. Treating the many symptoms of disease instead of the cause can be very profitable.

The author has thoroughly researched over twelve different foodborne pathogens and has compiled a very comprehensive resource to supply us with the facts we need to combat this growing problem of food-borne illness. What needs to be understood is that “ These infectious microbes can move from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and can localize anywhere, such as in the lungs, genitourinary tract, soft tissues, central nervous system, joints, bones, or heart valves, where they inflict serious damage.” Some of the infectious microbes covered in the book are; Salmonella, E. coli, Campylobacter, Shigella, Listeria, Noroviruses, Rotoviruses, Hepatitis, C.botulinum, Streptococcus, H. pylori, and more. Just a few of the serious consequences of these infections may include… Inflammatory bowel disease, Tourette’s syndrome, Alzheimer’s, different types of arthritis, liver inflammation, heart disorders, kidney disease, gallbladder problems, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and a wide range of other psychological and neurological conditions. The list is extensive.

Each chapter in the book covers a specific microbe or class of microbes. Hunter explores the myriad sources of microbial contamination and the federal laws pertaining to inspection of foods. Some chapters begin with case histories of people who were infected with a specific pathogen. These stories add interest and they also offer examples of what not to do when handling food. The many symptoms and chronic illnesses associated with food-borne infection are stressed. Of course the most important issue surrounding the subject of food-borne illness is prevention and the author focuses heavily on this subject throughout the book and in Part 4 of the book she devotes two whole chapters to this topic. Prevention includes personal hygiene, the sanitation of food and kitchen equipment, proper food storage, and adequate cooking times.

The information I found the most interesting was the research Hunter shared concerning the power of natural substances to prevent and heal food-borne illness. Our ancestors either knew instinctively or through trial and error, what scientists are now trying to validate through their modern research….that many herbs and spices are anti-viral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic. So…. not only do these natural substances add flavor to our foods but they can also make our food safer to eat. One example from the book speaks of adding lemon juice to water and how this appears to make the water safe to drink. Another example is the fact that the consumption of cranberries keeps E coli from adhering to the lining of the intestinal tract. Fermentation of foods can also destroy E-coli. Turmeric, garlic, goldenseal and bloodroot have strong actions against the H. pylori pathogen. This area of preventing and fighting food-borne infections with natural substances is exciting, promising and holds much hope for our future…however, more research is needed. Who will fund this research…. probably not the pharmaceutical industry.

The author includes information on the importance of having enough stomach acid (HCL), which plays an important role in killing food-borne pathogens and of course in the digestion of our food. She discusses the relationship between gastritis, H pylori, HCL and the absorption of B12 and folates.

Microbes are everywhere and some studies report that microbes make up from one to three percent of the total human body mass. Both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria live together in a well-rounded community when the body is in balance. These microbes play a vital role in the functioning of our immune systems.

Why do some people get sick from exposure to germs when others who have the same exposures stay healthy? This is a serious question that needs addressing. Until we better understand how the terrain of the body affects the growth and pathogenic nature of microbes we need to learn all we can about what foods harbor specific germs and how to lessen their numbers. Living with a centralized food system makes food safety a complex problem. In her book Infectious Connections, Beatrice Trum Hunter does a commendable job in tackling this crucial subject. Her book is well organized, well documented, easy to understand, and an important resource for doctors, other healthcare workers, chronically ill people or just for anyone who wishes to remain healthy. Understanding infectious connections will help to make the world a healthier place.