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Download Little Sister and the Month Brothers epub

by Beatrice Schenk De Regniers,Margot Tomes




A retelling of the Slavic folktale in which the Month Brothers' magic helps Little Sister fulfill seemingly impossible tasks which prove the undoing of her greedy stepmother and stepsister.
Download Little Sister and the Month Brothers epub
ISBN: 0688052932
ISBN13: 978-0688052935
Category: Children
Subcategory: Fairy Tales Folk Tales & Myths
Author: Beatrice Schenk De Regniers,Margot Tomes
Language: English
Publisher: Lothrop Lee & Shepard (September 1, 1994)
ePUB size: 1825 kb
FB2 size: 1608 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 344
Other Formats: mbr azw lit txt

Yannara
Description accurately described the product - I got what I expected.
Whitestone
Sweet and gently humorous telling of a classic story: the pretty and good-natured step-child, Little Sister, abused by her mean and ugly stepsisters and stepmother. In the end, the step-relatives get what they deserve. In this telling of a Slavic folk tale, the heroine is helped not by a fairy godmother but by the 12 month brothers. The illustrations are charming. I don't, however, recommend the Kindle version, as the print is too small, especially the clever little captions that lend so much rhythm to the reading.
Olelifan
Good story and love the artwork
Yozshujinn
This is a reprint of a book first published in 1975, based on a Slavic version of Cinderella. Little Sister does all the work while her cruel stepmother and petty stepsister look on. But despite her toil, Little Sister's beauty and joy grow -- and that won't do at all.

The story has a definite folk feel to it, as is to be expected. Some parents/kids like that, some don't -- our family is lukewarm on the matter. But the problem lays in "Margot Tome's endearing illustrations and spot drawing with unique and witty captions" (as the front flap explains). Unfortunately, the captions are neither of those, but instead (with a few successful exceptions) repeat what the text says. In other words, you have to either not read the captions or read the story twice. Not fun. I wish the editors had kept the captions that added to the story and deleted or at least altered the overwhelming majority that didn't. The caption issue may seems like a small detail, but it ends up undermining what I think is one of the most powerful things about good picture books -- that the words and illustrations work together to impart more meaning than either could alone.

If you like folktales and the caption issue doesn't bother you, then this book might be for you. Otherwise, consider passing it up.
ZEr0
Once upon a time there was a little orphaned girl everyone called Little Sister. She would have been all alone, except for the fact that she "lived with her stepmother and stepsister in a little cottage near a dark forest." Of course they were the wicked kind, but no matter, Little Sister didn't mind. She did all the chores, inside and out. "Sweep sweep sweep ... chop chop chop," but no matter, life was good (sorta). She was a cheery sort of person who was always happy. Oh, and she grew prettier by the day, something that didn't make her stepmother and stepsister particularly happy. What to do?

Well, the only thing Stepmother and Stepsister could think of was to "get rid of Little Sister." Now that she did mind. If a prince came by and saw that vision of loveliness he might just marry her. The snow swirled outside the cottage, but Little Sister's stepmother had spoken. "I want you to go to the forest and pick a bunch of violets for me." Huh? It was January and violets didn't come out until April. Out the door Little Sister went and her stepmother "slammed the door shut and locked it." Would the swirling snows swallow her up or would she somehow find those violets?

This is a charming retold tale about the ill-fated Little Sister children will love. One of the most endearing things about this tale are the small offset pictures of Little Sister and the other characters. They are conversing in a much more modern manner that made me smile and laugh. For example, when Stepmother sees her daughter looking at herself in a mirror she exclaims, "When Little Sister looks so happy and so pretty, it somehow make you look rather mean and ugly." This is a classic tale with a definite twist that is quite novel and very amusing at times. Not quite like Cinderella, but most definitely worth reading.
Oso
Oh, sometimes it's fun to read older non politically correct fairy tales where the protagonist wins in the end while the antagonists freeze to death. Little Sister and the Month Brothers is just that - it's a Slavic version of Cinderella where the beautiful yet humble Little Sister is forced to do the work for her ungrateful stepmother and stepsister. Never once does she complain, and when they shove her out in the middle of January to find violets, she thankfully runs into 12 guys known as the Month Brothers. These spirits not only help her complete several seemingly impossible tasks that her stepmother and stepsister force upon her, but they also deliver the comeuppance at the end of the book to those two nasty and greedy characters by essentially freezing them to death. At the end of the book, Little Sister gets married to an honest farmer and they live happily ever after.

While I enjoyed reading this tale, I am probably going to hold off reading this book to my kids until they are a bit older. The reaction of Little Sister to her stepmother and stepsister's demise is a little frightening (she is looking out the window smiling and thinking "They must be lost forever") and trying to figure out how to put it nicely to my kids that the two bad guys suffered a slow demise by hypothermia is something I'm planning on saving until they're older...or at least until they're at the age where they won't freak out on me with questions until 2 in the morning about how much did freezing to death hurt. That aside, it's a nicely illustrated book and while it's not my first choice of bedtime story, it's a classic that would be interesting to read to the kids down the line.