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Download The Art of the Start: The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything epub

by Paul Boehmer,Guy Kawasaki




What does it take to turn ideas into action? What are the elements of a perfect pitch? How do you win the war for talent? How do you establish a brand without bucks? These are some of the issues everyone faces when starting or revitalizing any undertaking, and Guy Kawasaki, former marketing maven of Apple Computer, provides the answers.The Art of the Start will give you the essential steps to launch great products, services, and companies-whether you are dreaming of starting the next Microsoft or a not-for-profit that's going to change the world. It also shows managers how to unleash entrepreneurial thinking at established companies, helping them foster the pluck and creativity that their businesses need to stay ahead of the pack. Kawasaki provides readers with GIST-Great Ideas for Starting Things-including his field-tested insider's techniques for bootstrapping, branding, networking, recruiting, pitching, rainmaking, and, most important in this fickle consumer climate, building buzz.At Apple, Kawasaki helped turn ordinary customers into fanatics. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, he has tested his iconoclastic ideas on real-world start-ups. And as an irrepressible columnist for Forbes, he has honed his best thinking about The Art of the Start.
Download The Art of the Start: The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything epub
ISBN: 1400140633
ISBN13: 978-1400140633
Category: Business
Subcategory: Small Business & Entrepreneurship
Author: Paul Boehmer,Guy Kawasaki
Language: English
Publisher: Tantor Audio; Library - Unabridged CD edition (January 19, 2009)
ePUB size: 1761 kb
FB2 size: 1498 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 917
Other Formats: lrf mobi txt mbr

Nikok
Below are key excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful:

1- "Great companies. Great divisions. Great schools. Great churches. Great not-for-profits. When it comes to the fundamentals of starting up, they are more alike than they are different. The key to their success is to survive the microscope tasks while bringing the future closer."

2- "GIST (GREAT IDEAS FOR STARTING THINGS): 1. MAKE MEANING 2. MAKE MANTRA. 3. GET GOING. 4. DEFINE YOUR BUSINESS MODEL. No 5. WEAVE A MAT (MILESTONES, ASSUMPTIONS, AND TASKS)."

3- "THE ART OF INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURING: PUT THE COMPANY FIRST...KILL THE CASH COWS...STAY UNDER THE RADAR...FIND A GODFATHER...GET A SEPARATE BUILDING...GIVE HOPE TO THE HOPEFUL...ANTICIPATE, THEN JUMP ON, TECTONIC SHIFTS...BUILD ON WHAT EXISTS...COLLECT AND SHARE DATA...LET THE VICE PRESIDENTS COME TO YOU...DISMANTLE WHEN DONE...REBOOT YOUR BRAIN."

4- "SEIZE THE HIGH GROUND Unless you are a rabbit about to be devoured by a coyote, good positioning is inspiring and energizing. It does not allow itself to • get mucked up in money, market share, and management egos. These i are the qualities to aspire to: POSITIVE...CUSTOMER-CENTRIC...EMPOWERING...In addition to seizing the high ground, good positioning is a workhorse. It is practical and serves tactical and strategic purposes that are easily understood and believed by customers, vendors, employees, journalists, and partners. Thus, good positioning also embodies these qualities: SELF-EXPLANATORY...SPECIFIC...CORE...RELEVANT...LONG-LASTING...DIFFERENTIATED."

5- "Many entrepreneurs try to perfect their business plan and then pull PowerPoint slides out of it. They view the business plan as ; the be-all and end-all, and the pitch as a subset of this magnificent document. This is backward thinking. A good business plan is a a detailed version of a pitch—as opposed to a pitch being a distilled version of a business plan. If you get the pitch right, you'll get the plan right."

6- "You can argue as much as you like about the precise number of calls bottom-up model yields a much more realistic forecast than even the most pessimistic market share estimates of a consultant's forecast about the total size of a market. The magnitude of your bottom-up forecast will establish the degree of bootstrapping you'll have to do. The only information that will point out the need for bootstrapping more accurately is looking at your bank account balance. "

7- "If you do take this path, however, understand that starting as a service business is a good initial path but isn't always the right long-term strategy. Getting customers to pay for your research and development should be only a temporary strategy for a product-based company. In the long run, a service business is fundamentally different from a product business. The former is all about slave labor and billable hours or projects. The latter is all about research and development, shipping, and spreading costs over thousands of boxes going out the door."

8- "Good recruiting starts at the top: CEOs must recruit the best people they can find. Next, good recruiting requires looking beyond superficialities such as race, creed, color, education, and work experience. Instead, you should focus on three factors: 1. Can the candidate do what you need: 2. Does the candidate believe in the meaning you're going to make? 3. Does the candidate have the strengths you need (as opposed to lacking the weaknesses you're trying to avoid)?"

9- "PREPARE A STRUCTURE FOR THE INTERVIEW BEFOREHAND...ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT SPECIFIC JOB SITUATIONS...STICK TO THE SCRIPT...DON'T OVERDO OPEN-ENDED, TOUCHY-FEELY QUESTIONS...TAKE COPIOUS NOTES...CHECK REFERENCES EARLY."

10- "Never assume you're done. Recruiting doesn't stop when a candidate accepts your offer, nor when he resigns from his current employer, nor on his last day at his current employer—not even after le starts at your organization. In actuality, recruiting never stops. Every day is a new contract between a startup and an employee."

11- "What most organizations learned is that partnerships are hard to make work. Though both parties wanted 2 + 2 to equal 5, they ended up with 3 instead. The problem is that glamour, flattery, and potential press coverage often seduced organizations into entering nonsensical collaborations. The gist of good partnering is that it should accelerate cash flow, increase revenue, and reduce costs. Partnerships built on solid business principles like these have a much greater likelihood of succeeding. Once you understand this, a partnership is simply a matter of implementation: making sure the people who do the real work buy into it, finding internal champions, focusing on strengths, cutting win-win deals, waiting for the right moment to bring in lawyers and legal documents, and establishing ways to end the relationship."

12- "World-class schmoozers adopt Rezac's outward, what-can-I-do-for-you attitude. It is the key to building extensive, long-lasting connections. Upon this foundation, here's how to get more people to know you: GET OUT...ASK GOOD QUESTIONS, THEN SHUT UP...FOLLOW UP."
I love Mercedes
Recently, I have been assisting a start-up in preparation for raising Venture Capital. At the recommendation of a friend, I bought The ART of the START The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything by Guy Kawasaki. Mr. Kawasaki is a venture-capitalist. Prior to becoming a VC, Mr. Kawasaki worked at Apple.
Mr. Kawasaki set as his goal for the book to help entrepreneurs and others starting enterprises reduce the preparatory time and move straight into development. (Prep time including visiting with various experts to collect ideas, learn potential problems that can be avoided, etc.)
Mr. Kawasaki writes with style, verve and an appealing since of humor.
He starts with a summary of five things that each new effort should include. One of the intriguing concepts is to avoid developing a mission statement, but instead develop a very short mantra. Having been in some very unproductive, long, painful, meetings where mission statements were being hatched, I can appreciate the recommendation. As an example, he uses the famous "Think" from IBM as an example (I have one of the paperweights from years gone by that IBM used to give to customers that has the Think motto engraved).
Another recommendation from Mr. Kawasaki is to move straight to product development and selling. Product testing in his view is the realm of big established businesses - not start-ups. Build and modify in response to customer reactions. If customers use the product differently from your, plan, celebrate it and see if you can spread that utilization to create more customers.
Chapters roughly follow the development cycle of start-up formation, product development and refinement, capital raising, partnering, brand development and growth phase. The book concludes with a chapter on "The Art of Being a Mensch", a treatise on being nice to everyone you meet, regardless of their circumstance.
Each Chapter has an FAQ section, with very useful questions and answers, presumably culled from questions the author received during speaking engagements. I found those contained immense practical advice and good common sense. I give Mr. Kawasaki extra credit for his quotes. While opening chapters and adding the occasional quote is a technique widely used, he found a variety of really cool, totally appropriate, quotes.
This book isn't new - it's been around for a while. But if you are involved in a start-up, or doing a new venture inside an existing company, I think you will find something of both interest and value.
Highly recommended.
Global Progression
This book was recommended by an affiliate marketing entrepreneur through an email blog I opted into. Arnak didn't say much about it, but he didn't recommend another book. I got the book, and it sat on my desk few a few weeks. I went to the inlaws on christmas day. We, my wife and I, got their about 4 pm. By the next morning I had read the whole book. I also had time to visit, have the Christmas dinner and gift exchange.

What a great read. I equivocated venture capitalists to normal people that I would market products too, and I think the same theories apply. However, my clients will not eventually take over my company, but I guess if I mismanage it, it's the same thing. Great book, I recommend it to a wider audience outside of venture capital seekers that this book is focused on.